sanding

 

If you are planning to restore your wood flooring, there are a couple of things you’ll need to bear in mind.  The first is that the more effort you put into the preparation for this job, the better the end result and the second is, it’s not a job you should aim to do in a single afternoon!

Here are a few basic steps to help restore your wood flooring:

Preparation

Sanding

Staining (if you are planning to stain your floor)

Finishing

Preparation

In order to prepare your floor for restoration, you need to clear the room of all furniture, curtains, rugs and ornaments.  Basically, anything that can be removed from the room should be removed.   When you are removing heavy items, remember to lift them and not drag them across your floor, which could result in damage.

Once your room is clear, check the floor’s surface for any protruding nails or staples, which should be either hammered into the floor or removed, otherwise they’ll cause havoc when it comes to sanding.  This is also a great opportunity to fix any loose boards as well as the right time for identifying any deep staining which you will need to sand a bit more aggressively than the rest of the floor.

Sanding

There is no doubt that the easiest way to restore your wood flooring to its former glory is by hiring a floor sander.  Ideally you’ll need two types of sander.  The first is a drum stander and the second an edge sander.  You’ll need to hire both to achieve a great result.  The sandpaper required for these sanders is completely different and will be supplied by the hire company.  It’s important to make sure you have a coarse and a finer sandpaper in “stock” when you start the job.  The initial sanding should be done with the coarser paper and the finishing sanding with the finer paper.  As with all machinery, it’s important to respect the Health and Safety guidelines you will receive when you hire the sanders.

It is during the sanding process that you’ll see any holes, deep scratches or chips which need to be filled or repaired.

Staining

Staining is an optional part of the restoration process for your wooden flooring, but if you decide you want to stain your floor, now is the time to do it.  To get a good result, you should work in full widths of your room and start by painting the stain and finish by wiping it with a soft, dry cloth.

Finishing

Irrespective of whether or not you decide to stain your floor, the finish is a really important part of restoring your wood floor.  Once you have selected your finish, you should start to apply it to the perimeter of your room and work inwards and towards the exit of your room, to minimise the risk of stepping on flooring you’ve just treated.  Depending on the type of finish you’ve chosen, you will need to apply up to 3 coats.  It’s a good idea to carry out a light sanding between coats.  Finally, make sure your finish is completely dry before replacing your furnishings (the manufacturers instructions will give you a guide to drying time).